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Ultra Short Throw Projectors – The National Archives

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The finished effect is really quite impressive, with the exhibition mirroring the kind of chic, exciting and illusive feel such a nightclub in the 20’s would have had and therefore helping visitors relate to the topic at hand.

The National Archives are the “guardian of some of the UK Government’s most iconic documents, dating back more than 1,000 years” with the goal of making these archives available to the entire country. “Archives are for everyone because they are about everyone – past, present and future.”

The National Archives boasts an ever changing dedicated exhibition space, with their latest exhibition taking a look at the surge in nightclub entertainment following the First World War. ‘The 1920’s: Beyond the Roar’, features a recreation of the infamous Club 43, which repeatedly broke licensing laws by selling alcohol outside of permitted hours and without a licence. Club 43 became a key example that politicians would point to when enforcing unpopular limits on the entire nightclub scene.

National Archives 20's exhibit piano with projector

This dark, atmospheric exhibition utilised light sparingly, setting a very particular vibe and making it the perfect location for the smart use of various ultra short throw projectors throughout. Some displayed a series of quotes in period-accurate typeface, such as one from Club 43’s owner Kate Meyrick, the nicknamed ‘Nightclub Queen of Soho’.

“I have made a fortune, lost it, made some more… and lost it again. All the while defying the killjoys! They will never take away my life of life – real life – life, brilliant and pulsating!”

Another ultra short throw projector was used with clever masking of the content to bring protestors placards to life, a great way to add archive media to the exhibition with a clear indication of its subject matter.

Whilst here you can see a third projector utilised in a more conventional manner.

The finished effect is really quite impressive, with the exhibition mirroring the kind of chic, exciting and illusive feel such a nightclub in the 20’s would have had and therefore helping visitors relate to the topic at hand.

Katie Fox, Digital Engagement Manager at The National Archives says “I’d like people to draw parallels between 1920s people and us today as 2020s people – they were also dealing with a pandemic and living in a society that is really advocating for change, amongst multiple other similarities. We would love people to have a think about that and how we are all 20s people.”

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